Net Worth Update: May 2016

Happy May!  I hope April treated you well and tax day didn’t crush you like it crushed me!  Even though taxes came due, our net worth still went up $6,379.32!! I’ll take a $6K jump every month…

April Financial Breakdown

House: $383,728 – $321,484 $62,244.  I’m just using zillow.com as the baseline here.  They give their estimate for how much they think you’re home is worth.  I’m not saying it’s accurate but it’s a decent way to keep track without bringing an appraiser in every month to help you track your net worth. This month it said the value of my home went up $4,197.00.

My 401k: $18,689.37.  Right now 5% of my salary is going into my 401k via my employer. Nothing crazy here.  According to my account at personal capital, my portfolio only increased 1.79% over the course of April.

Pension Fund: $8,215.40.  I’m one of the few remaining workers in America that contribute to an employee pension fund and if I decide to stay with my employer and retire 24 years from now I will receive a pension.  I DO NOT PLAN ON DOING THIS!  I’m all about early retirement!!!

My Old 401k: $8,497.11.  This 401k is from an old employer.  I need to roll this over into a Roth IRA.  Hopefully I get to this very soon…


Wifey 401k: $4,682.47. Same situation as my 401k.  5% match from her employer.

Wifey Old 401k: $3,300. Also in the same situation as my old 401k.  We also need to roll this over to a Roth IRA very soon.

Car: $13,174.00.  Well, I don’t know what to say on this one.  According to kbb.com, the value of my car actually increased by $174 over the past month.  I won’t expect an increase on a vehicle ever again but it’s a nice surprise.

Jeep: $10,763.00.

Emergency Fund: $8,016.98.  The emergency fund took a hit this past month due to taxes.  I owed over $3k and was able to cash flow over $2k of it, but I had to dip into the emergency fund for just over $1,000 of it.

TOTAL NET WORTH: $137,582.33 (+$6,379.32)

So 2nd post of my net worth in the books.  I’m not expecting to see gains of over $6,000 for a while, especially since over $4,000 of it was due to gains on the value of my home.

Keep in mind, the first few years of beginning to build your net worth are slow but once you get some momentum it’ll shoot up faster than you can imagine!

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Net Worth Update: $131,203.01

Welcome to April everybody!  I hope March treated you well and you were able to take advantage of a market that wasn’t losing money.  The S&P 500 increased 3.98% over the last 30 days.  It wasn’t a great month for investments but at least it wasn’t like January!

Since this is my first post on my net worth updates, I’m just going to list everything out and I won’t really have any detailed explanations about what’s going on like I will in future net worth posts.  You can also see in the “My Net Worth” excel pic that there is nothing there for “last month.”  That’s because this is the first month I’ve started using it.

I’m currently not investing in any 401k’s or other investments.  I do have balances in 401k’s but the only changes in those investments are from my employers contributions and the ups and downs of the market.  Right now I’m in Step 3 and I’m just building up an emergency fund of 6 months worth of expenses.

So, here we go…

April Financial Breakdown

House: $379,531 – $322,085 $57,446.  I’m just using zillow.com as the baseline here.  They give their estimate for how much they think you’re home is worth.  I’m not saying it’s accurate but it’s a decent way to keep track without bringing an appraiser in every month to help you track your net worth.

My 401k: $17,660.16.  Right now 5% of my salary is going into my 401k via my employer.

Pension Fund: $7,975.  I’m one of the few remaining workers in America that contribute to a pension fund and if I decide to stay with my employer and retire 24 years from now I will receive a pension.  I DO NOT PLAN ON DOING THIS!  I’m all about early retirement!!!

My Old 401k: $7,991.85.  This 401k is from an old employer.  I need to roll this over into a Roth IRA.  Hopefully I get to this very soon…


Wifey 401k: $3,779. Same situation as my 401k.  5% match from her employer.

Wifey Old 401k: $3,300. Also in the same situation as my old 401k.  We also need to roll this over to a Roth IRA very soon.

Car: $13,000.  I know, I know.  Many people don’t like counting the value of vehicles towards their net worth for whatever reason they choose, but I do because I could easily sell my car and have $13,000 in cash if I needed it.

Jeep: $11,000.  Same here…

Emergency Fund: $9,051.  I’m sad to say that I do not have my 6 month emergency fund saved up yet.  But, we’re working on it and will hopefully be where we need to be in the next 6 months or so.  GOAL? $20,000 right now.

TOTAL NET WORTH: $131,203.01

So there it is.  My first post on my net worth.  It’s obviously not where I want it to be right now but when I’m done building a solid foundation I will be able to invest a lot of money and build my net worth much faster than I can right now.

The first few years of beginning to build your net worth are slow but once you get some momentum it’ll shoot up faster than you can imagine!

**If you like talking about Money, Paying Off Debt, Building Your Net Worth and Retiring Early…This is the place for you!  Subscribe to receive emails of new blog posts, news, tips, and exclusive content!!!

 

 

How much house can you truly afford?

If you’re like me and you’re on a mission to retire early, you need to know that the choices you make always affect your timeframe for when you’ll reach early retirement.  It can shorten how long it is until you reach your goal or it can push it back further and further into the future.  How much of a house you buy will be one of the most crucial financial decisions you’ll make.

extravagant home
Why have a home like this if you have to worry about paying the mortgage for the next 30 years?

Like everything in the world, there are many different opinions when it comes to how much you should spend on housing.  There are many people who think that their house is an investment and it’s ok if they have a ridiculous mortgage payment on an extravagant home.  On the opposite end of the spectrum, there’s a large movement of individuals who lean towards keeping there expenses down to nothing which has in turn created a housing market for “tiny” houses.  Personally, I pretty much stand right in the middle.  I like to keep my expenses low but with a wife, 2 kids, and 2 dogs I can’t really force them to spend the rest of their lives in 300 square foot house.

I’ve never really liked to think of my house as an investment but I can acknowledge the fact that houses do appreciate over time.  At 3% appreciation over 30 years, a $235,000 house becomes worth $485,000.  Not too shabby, but it isn’t guaranteed and shouldn’t be relied on.


How Much Should I Spend On A House?

When figuring out how much you want to spend on a house, you want to avoid any advice from the banks.  Banks will allow you buy a house where the mortgage will be around 50% of your take home pay (and they wonder why there was a housing crisis).  If you’re spending 50% of your monthly take home pay on a house, you’re house poor ladies and gentlemen.  Personally, I’d like to see everyone keep their house payment around 25% of their take home pay when financed with a fixed rate 15 year mortgage.  At 25%, you have the ability to buy a decent house, pay off that house earlyinvest a lot of money, and have a little bit of a life.

House-PoorWouldn’t it be great if you owned a home that you could afford AND pay off early?  Doing it this way will allow you to not only invest more money in retirement but you’ll also have a possible appreciating asset ready to sell if you desire.  If it doesn’t appreciate?  You won’t have to worry about it because you don’t owe a dime on it.  I’ve never seen a bank foreclose on a house that doesn’t have a mortgage!

Most of house poor America is barely able to pay their mortgage because they received terrible advice from somewhere and significantly overpaid.  They invest less than 5% of their income, drive cars with car payments, eat out constantly, and spend every dime they receive.  Please don’t be like everyone else!  Don’t mess up the biggest financial decision you’ll make by over paying for a house.  It’s easy to get house fever while you’re walking around with a real estate agent.  Be patient, be disciplined, and remember to sleep on any decision you’re thinking about.  Your financial freedom is depending on it!

Remember, 25% of your take home pay on a fixed rate, 15 year mortgage!

**If you like talking about Money, Paying Off Debt, Building Your Net Worth and Retiring Early…This is the place for you!  Subscribe to receive emails of new blog posts, news, tips, and exclusive content!!!